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Mental Health


Addictions

People use alcohol and other drugs for many reasons. Some use these substances to help them to relax, to feel more lively, to feel less inhibited or to feel pleasure. Some find the effects of substances make it seem easier to cope with problems. Some use substances for religious reasons or to fit in with the crowd. Others may be curious about the effects of a specific drug.

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Anxiety Disorder

We all feel nervous or worried at times. This anxiety can be a helpful feeling when it motivates us or warns us of danger. An anxiety disorder, on the other hand, causes unexpected or unhelpful anxiety that seriously impacts our lives, including how we think, feel, and act.

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Concurrent Mental Illnesses and Substance Use Problems

A real problem in Canada is that mental health and substance use systems are often separate. This means that many people have to receive treatment and support for their illnesses separately, or they are denied access to care for one problem because of the other problems they have. Fortunately, more service providers are now developing more integrated treatment options for concurrent problems.

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Coping With Loneliness

Loneliness that persists can be linked to depression, anxiety, and increased risk of other health problems. If feelings of loneliness are affecting your life, consider reaching out to a mental health professional.

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Depression and Bipolar Disorder

We all experience changes in our mood. Sometimes we feel energetic, full of ideas, or irritable, and other times we feel sad or down. But these moods usually don’t last long, and we can go about our daily lives. Depression and bipolar disorder are two mental illnesses that change the way people feel and make it hard for them to go about their daily routine.

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Feeling Angry

We all feel angry sometimes. Most of the time, we can deal with feelings of anger or irritability quickly. We may resolve the situation or look at the problem from a different perspective. However, anger can cause problems in our lives and the lives of those around us. Learn more about recognizing problem anger and taking action.

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Getting Help

Some people worry about asking for help because there can be stigma around mental health problems. They may believe that asking for help means admitting that something is wrong. Some people worry about how others might see them. Asking for help means that you want to make changes or take steps towards your new health goals. We should celebrate the courage it takes to speak up and make changes. Getting help is part of recovery.

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Grieving

Loss is one of life’s most stressful events. It takes time to heal, and everyone responds differently. We may need help to cope with the changes in our lives. Grief is part of being human, but that doesn’t mean we have to go through the journey alone.

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Mental Illnesses

What do you think of when you hear that someone is experiencing a mental illness? Some people feel concern, fear, or confusion. Some even avoid those who experience mental illnesses. But mental illnesses are just like any other illness: everyone deserves care, help, and support.

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Mindfulness

Many of us lead busy lives. We are busy thinking about yesterday and busy planning for tomorrow. When we focus on the past and future, we aren’t paying a lot of attention to the present—where we are right now. Mindfulness is simply an invitation to step out of the clutter and really focus on what we are doing, thinking, and feeling in this moment.

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Phobias And Panic Disorder

Everyone feels scared at times. But sometimes, fear can come up in a situation that isn’t expected. This fear stops us from going about our usual routines or working towards our goals. Phobias and panic disorder are two examples of mental illnesses that can lead to these problems.

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Preventing Suicide

Suicide. It’s a difficult topic to bring up. However, when someone talks about suicide or brings up concern for a loved one, it’s important to take action and seek help quickly.

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Psychotherapy

Many people find that the simple act of talking with family and friends can help them see a new perspective, solve a problem, or simply feel supported. Sometimes talking with a friend isn’t enough, and you need more specialized help and support. Psychotherapy is another type of conversation that can help you feel better.

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Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)

Frightening situations happen to everyone at some point. People can react in many different ways: they might feel nervous, have a hard time sleeping well, or go over the details of the situation in their mind. These thoughts or experiences are a normal reaction. They usually decrease over time and the people involved can go back to their daily lives.

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Resiliency

Resilience is often described as a personal attribute that may allow one to remain relatively unchanged by a traumatic event (Bensimon, 2012). A resilient individual typically maintains relatively stable levels of psychological and physical functioning during and after the traumatic event.

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Stress

We all talk about stress, but we’re not always clear about what it is. Stress comes from both the good and the bad things that happen to us. If we didn’t feel any stress, we wouldn’t be alive! Stress may feel overwhelming at times, but there are many strategies to help you take control.

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Suicide Education, Awareness and Prevention

About 4,000 Canadians die by suicide every year. Suicide is the second-most common cause of death among young people, but men in their 40s and 50s have the highest rate of suicide. While women are three to four times more likely to attempt suicide than men, men are three times more likely to die by suicide than women.

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Supporting A Loved One

When someone you love has been diagnosed with a mental illness, you feel a mixture of emotions. Concern, compassion, disbelief, anger, relief, anxiety, grief, love, guilt ... any and all of these emotions are understandable and normal.

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Tips to Improve Mental Health

Good mental health helps us to achieve balance and cope with stressful times. Here are some tips to improve your overall mental health.

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Top 10 Stress Relievers

We understand how difficult your job is, and overtime stress will accumulate and take over your judgement and decision making process. Here are 10 tips to help relieve stress.

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Toward Recovery - Working WIth Your Treatment Provider

Recovery from a mental illness is expected. And it’s not necessarily an end point—it can be a process that you work on no matter where you are in (or out of) treatment. For some people, recovery may mean living without any symptoms of a mental illness at all.

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Understanding Substance Abuse

The idea that you must hit ‘rock bottom’ and experience serious consequences like losing your job or losing important relationships before you’re ready for help isn’t true. You can seek help or support any time you reflect on your own substance use and would like to make some changes.

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